Psalm 30:1-5 The Author of Healing

11 04 2013

Jesus-healing

 

“I will extol you, O Lord, for you have drawn me up, and did not let my foes rejoice over me.

O Lord my God, I cried to you for help, and you have healed me. 

O Lord, you brought up my soul from Sheol, restored me to life from among those gone down to the Pit.

Sing praises to the Lord, O you his faithful ones, and give thanks to his holy name.

For his anger is but for a moment; his favor is for a lifetime. Weeping may linger for the night, but joy comes with the morning.”- Psalm 30:1-5 (NRSV)

“Faith healing” is a concept that atheists and agnostics latch onto with a great deal of derision, and in some ways rightfully so.  Unfortunately there are “faith healing” scams that go back to the times of the indulgence and relic purveyors, (the sales of indulgences and relics were two of the motivating factors behind the Reformation) so it’s easy to understand the cynicism.  Even today there are plenty of preachers willing to sell you a prayer cloth, holy water, and/or promise divine healing for a “small donation.”

miracle water

Leroy Jenkins’ “Miracle Water-” Straight from the Olentangy River to you!

There is also a small subgroup of Charismatic/Pentecostals who engage in snake handling- a practice derived from a verse at the end of the Gospel of Mark that does not appear in every manuscript:

“And these signs will accompany those who believe: by using my name they will cast out demons; they will speak in new tongues; they will pick up snakes in their hands, and if they drink any deadly thing, it will not hurt them; they will lay their hands on the sick, and they will recover.” Mark 16:17-19 (NRSV)

snake-handling-file-photo

As an aside, I do handle snakes- regularly.  I have a ball python and a red-tail boa.  Both the python and the boa are non-venomous snakes, however, unlike the rattlesnake being tormented here.  I’m not touching him. There is a way to tell venomous from non-venomous snakes, and there is a right and a wrong way to handle constrictors as well.   As far as speaking in tongues, I probably know enough French and German to get myself smacked, but that’s pretty much it.  I haven’t cast out any demons that I know of, though I do let the dogs out every morning.  The deadliest thing I’ll voluntarily drink is coffee, and as far as I know I’ve never healed anyone by touching them.  If anything, I’ve probably spread germs by touching people.

I think God gave us intellect for a reason, if only to keep us from voluntarily doing things that will cause us to earn our Darwin Awards. I think the intent of the passage in Mark was not to encourage anyone to purposefully seek out venomous snakes to dance with, or to tell people to drink poison and put God to the test.  I think what he meant was if someone was accidentally snake-bit or exposed to poison, or if these things were imposed on them as a persecutor’s torment, that they would arise unscathed- sort of like Daniel in the lions’ den.

If we put the scams put forth by unscrupulous televangelists and purveyors of the prosperity gospel aside, as well questionable practices such as snake-handling, there is a deeper element to divine healing than healing a physical illness.

Sometimes God effects miraculous healings such as Jesus’ healings that we read of in the Bible- Lazarus, the paralyzed man, the leper, and likely many more.  But more often God gives us the same answer He gave the apostle Paul- no.  I’ll be the first one to say that I don’t understand why some people get cancer, then they’re prayed over and they get treatment and they recover, while others are prayed over, get treatment and they die.  I do know that the one thing that all human beings are subjected to (other than birth- and taxation) is physical death.

So what about the “un-healed?”

There is no healing apart from God, just as there is no creation, no growth, no thing apart from God.  Regardless of how it came to be, entropy is a part of this world.  Things decay and die in this world.

Whether we find healing on this side of heaven, or on the other side, is God’s prerogative.

Perhaps God has a reason for leaving the thorn there?  There was a reason He said no to the apostle Paul when he asked to have the thorn removed, even though that reason was never revealed to Paul.

empathy

If not for pain, how would we learn empathy?  If not for rejection and loss, how would we appreciate the extravagant gift of another’s presence?

God’s ways are not our ways, but as near as I can tell, His healing can be gradual and it can involve pain, but in His time, He will make us whole.


Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: