1 Corinthians 9:24-25 Race to Win, and Colossians 3:1 My Parents’ Wisdom

20 03 2013

running-05

“Do you not know that in a race the runners all compete, but only one receives the prize? Run in such a way that you may win it.  Athletes exercise self-control in all things; they do it to receive a perishable wreath, but we an imperishable one.”  1 Corinthians 9:24-25 (NRSV)

Today’s question:

Are you “running the race” for a heavenly prize or an earthly one?  What does this imply for how you discipline yourself?

I’ve never been much for competitive sports.  First of all my physical coordination is abysmal, and I have no athletic ability.  I remember attempting to play softball when I was a small child (before I got rheumatic fever and was forbidden from organized sports.)  I was usually last in the batting order and way, way out in the outfield.  Until my grandmother made the school aware that my family doctor had forbidden me from gym class and brought the doctor’s note, I actually did take gym class -until I was in eighth grade and ended up in the ER with a badly sprained ankle from attempting to run laps.  It was not pretty.  Everyone else knew how badly coordinated I was and how bad I sucked at every single activity in gym class, and so I was always chosen last for teams.  Sometimes the kids fought over who had to take me, although if the boys were included in the team activity, I was usually preferred over the not-so hygienic boy who ate boogers and dead bugs.

I do believe in personal fitness, even though I don’t get into organized sports.  The current wisdom for people like me with joint damage and minor heart valve damage is that exercise is necessary and healthy, including plenty of cardio, and preferably no or limited impact exercise. Swimming, walking or bicycling are the preferred types of exercise for me as I have a good deal of deterioration in my joints.   No, I don’t have six pack abs and I will not be doing any biathalons any time soon.

lap-swim

The only one I “compete” against is me.  How many laps can I swim or how many minutes can I put in on the elliptical machine?  Probably not as many as most people, but I know that exercise is necessary for bodily health, so I do it the best I can.

I’ve long since been tired of the always-on mentality this society wants people to have- achieve this, get that, know this, do that.  In the eternal scheme of things, how much do those things really matter?  Not flipping much.  The more time goes by I care less and less about much of what the world deems to be important.

I can’t say that I always live in such a manner that I am working toward the “imperishable wreath.”  I’m not the most disciplined individual.  I have many flaws. I make a lot of mistakes.  And this journey would be completely impossible for me, save for the strength and power of Christ.

 

holy family

 

“So if you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God.” Colossians 3:1 (NRSV)

Today’s question:

What attitude taught by your parents do you need to reaffirm?

Mom and Dad have a sort of strange relationship as far as their faith.  Mom converted to Catholicism when she was in high school- before Vatican II.  She is very much a practicing Catholic, including saying Rosaries, going to Confession regularly, praying to various saints and observing holy days and seasons.  Dad grew up as a Regular Baptist, but dropped out of the church when there was a scandal involving the leader of the youth group he belonged to.  Even though Dad isn’t directly involved in a Christian community, he does know the Bible and he does pray, and he lives as a Christian witness. Both of their traditions are highly conservative, and they actually agree on core issues such as the sanctity of human life, but those traditions’ theologies  are strikingly different, to put it mildly.

From one side (mostly my grandmother) I heard that a person had to accept Christ and pray the “sinner’s prayer” to be saved. From my Mom’s side I heard you have to be baptized and believe and then follow all the rules and maybe you’ll be saved and maybe not.  So Mom and Dad didn’t agree on how one is saved, or means of grace, or what sacraments are and aren’t.  (I don’t agree with either of them on the issue of sacraments!) That confused me.  So I had to find these things out for myself, which isn’t easy to do when your parents disagree on important issues of faith.

Word___Sacrament_1

 

As time went on I observed their attitudes toward each other’s faith tradition soften.  Part of that I think was the influence of ecumenism and Vatican II, when it was declared to Catholics that Protestants were no longer to be deemed “heathens” but considered to be “separated brethren.”  I think we are all “separated brethren” over some things, and part of our calling in this life is to agree to disagree and love God and each other anyway.

I don’t see Dad becoming Catholic anytime soon, but I do believe that I will see him in heaven.  I believe I’ll see Mom too, even though I don’t see her at the tent revival running up for the next altar call.   God makes fewer distinctions regarding who’s in and who’s out than we do.

I’ve really been encouraged that they pray together.  It took years for them to actually do that, but they do now.  That’s something that I wish that I could do with Jerry, (I’m always praying for him, whether he knows it or not,) but he is an agnostic and thinks prayer is a lost cause.

If I am really seeking the things of Christ, then I would seek to reconcile myself not only with God, but with those who don’t share my faith.  Sometimes it breaks my heart, but Jesus calls us to love others even when they aren’t lovable, and when we disagree.